Clash of the Pantheons:

The description of my blog is “a blog dedicated to my adventures in studying Neo-Paganism in central Ohio.”, and I feel like I have not written a whole lot on that topic. So today I thought I would tackle a topic not often talked about. “Clash of the Pantheons”.

Back in the late 90s-early 2000s there was a strong trend in Wicca of “plug-and-play” deities. It was widely excepted that the gods were just archetypes and any deity of the desired archetype could be inserted ritual and spell work. As someone that was devoted to a specific Pantheon that rubbed me the wrong way. I felt to was kind of disrespectful to the deities. I also robbed the practitioner and the deity of the full richness of that deities cultural background. while I still feel that way I realize now that experimenting with different deities till you find the ones that resonate with you is not a bad thing for beginners.

Moving forward to the present. As I have mentioned before I have been attending ADF Druid rituals to celebrate the Wheel of the Year. I am running in to a road block as it were. They are Druids and as such a majority of their rituals are to Celtic deities. I only work with the Roman/Hellenistic pantheon. While at first it was neat learning more about Celtic deities I am beginning to feel uncomfortable attending the rituals. Giving lip service to a god I don’t honor just to socialize feels shallow. On top of this the increasing dissatisfaction with the politics of this grove is making socialization itself feel shallow. The simplest solution would be to stop attending but that is not the overall point of this post. The point is asking the question:

“How do you deal with being at a public ritual that honors a deity you don’t know or care about?”

I asked around on Facebook and got the following suggestions:

  • Enjoy the socialization and community of the other attendees.
  • Look at it as an opportunity to learn a new deity.
  • Identify and Appreciate the Archetype

Yeah Okay I’ve tried all that. Those may work for other people but it is not working for me. It is like going to the birthday party of someone you don’t know just because your friends are there. It is awkward and rude. It also feels like I am disrespecting my own pantheon when I work with other deities. Maybe I am just too set in my ways? Maybe I should take people’s advise and get over my feelings and go anyways? But why? If I am not getting anything out of attending what is the point of going? It would be no different than an Atheist going to Church just because the people he want to be friends with are? It is faking it in hopes things will get better. Dose that ever really work? No wonder so many people prefer to be solitary practitioners it is so much easier. No social drama and no dealing with a Clash of Pantheons.

I suppose from the outside looking in a clash of pantheons is a ridiculous situation. My imaginary friends and your imaginary friends don’t want to play together. Does this count as an adventure in paganism? Dealing with the pitfalls of group dynamics, emotional discomfort, and strange gods? Well it would if this was a game of Dungeons & Dragons it would so sure an adventure then.

How many other people out there have a similar problem? How do you deal with going to a public / group ritual where they are honoring deities foreign to you?

 

 

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Book Review: Herbal Tea for the Pagan Spirit.

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Herbal Tea for the Pagan Spirit; Inspirational Stories of the Pagan Path by Emerys Somerled.

A Short review for a short book, only 141 pages.  This is a collection of feel good stories about people practicing paganism, similar to the “Chicken Soup for the Soul” book series. It is the kind of book one can in squeeze in to short amounts of time like coffee breaks at work. It leaves you feeling all warm and fuzzy. This is a book I plan on loaning out to friends because it is a great pick me up for people that feel are feeling a disconnect from their chosen spiritual path. It is also a great read for solitary practitioners that are feeling a little too isolated and alone and want to feel some connection to the larger pagan community.

If you are are looking for more books that are full of pagans sharing their personal stories you might also want to check out . Cakes and Ale for the Pagan Soul, edited by Patricia Telesco

 

Book Review: Empedocles; Fragments and Commentary

Empedocles: Fragments and Commentary

Translated by Arthur Fairbanks 1864 -1944

I first came across the name Empedocles while reading The Praeger Encyclopedia of Ancient Greek Civilization. Yes I am that level of history geek that I read an encyclopedia front to back A-Z. The entries were good short reads while I was on break at work. I always got a book in my locker. Anyways it is a good acquisition for any serious scholar, I got mine used for three bucks from the local pagan shop The Magical Druid a few years ago.

So back to the subject at hand Empedocles. He was a Greek Philosopher that lived 490 – 430 B.C.E. making him a contemporary of Zeno of Elea.  The thing that caught my attention about his entry was that he had written an alternative cosmic cycle myth. I was curious to see what other origin myths the Greeks had come up with apart from what Hesiod and Plato had wrote. Apparently this philosopher had written two works On Nature and Purifications. The surviving works are in fragments and partially preserved as quotes in other authors works which is the “Commentary” part of the book. Aristotle and Plato are the authors that are used specifically as the commentators in the back of this book. Which because of its age is available free on the internet here is Empedokles books if you want to read it for yourself.

My assessment on the works themselves; I think that this is a great original source read for modern pagans. It is one man struggling to explain his vision of the forces of nature and comes up with the idea that every thing comes from the polarity of Love and Strife. He describes what we now call Yin & Yang. He talks about after the influence of the polarity struggle every thing is made up from the four elements  Earth, Air, Fire Water. He teaches reincarnation and transmigration of the soul. Wiki says this is because he was influenced by the Pythagoreans.  Yin & Yang, the Four Elements and Reincarnation! Empedocles is teaching Wicca 101!

On a theological note the Deities that he references in his works are The Muses, Aphrodite, and Strife.

 

Am I Trading in Druid Robes for a Witch’s Hat?

Once the shopping frenzy of December is over winter seems to drag on forever. The temperatures here in Ohio have been crazy swinging from 19 degrees to 50 and then back down to 30 degrees some times in the same day. The warmer days have me yearning for spring. I have already ordered all the seeds for my vegetable garden and am planing my flower bed too.

I missed doing out on attending a public Yule ritual due to illness, and ended up missing the Druid’s Imbolc because I was still recovering from the flu. But a few days later I was well enough to attend a Imbolc celebration held by the Wiccan shop “Blessed Be”. This was my first time experiencing a Wiccan ritual. I got luck because it was a two for one ritual. The first part was for Imbolc and the second part was a full moon ritual.

I can honestly say it was a fun and enlightening experience. There was about 27 participants.  We were outside in the cold, under the moon (hidden behind a cloud of coarse cause you know Ohio weather never does what you want it to) and it help me really appreciate the timeless tradition of humans huddling around a fire and encouraging each other to be strong, be creative and be nurturing and remember ‘Spring is coming’. Most importantly every social interaction felt natural. None of my normal feelings of social anxiety crept into my brain. There was no intimidating auras, no pecking order, or performers vs. audience vibe that I sometimes get at other pagan events.

It reminded me why I first fell in love with paganism in the first place, and it reminded me of my early days when I use to claimed Wiccan. A while back I had grown disenchanted with Wicca due to trends in literature and online content back in the early 2000’s. I have just claimed Greeco-Roman pagan for the longest time. I have been thinking of  joining the ADF  because I had not found any Hellenistic groups, but the past few months I have been reconsidering that. I am not sure if it is right for me. This feeling of reconnecting with Wicca the past few days has me thinking that maybe it is time for me to come full circle in my studies and revisit Wicca beyond one public ritual.

To my readers I ask, have any of you ever left Wicca for other pagan paths and then found yourself going back to it? If so I would love to hear your story.

 

First Weeks of Fall

September is gone and October is just begun.  In those first few weeks of fall I spent my leisure time gathering walnuts from both my back yard and the woods to get enough to make walnut baklava later.  I also went paw-paw  hunting. For those that don’t know a paw paw is a tropical like fruit that grows in the Appalachian area of the USA. It can only be harvested during mid September. It is a local only treat that taste like summers’s last hurrah, with its banana /mango like flavor and custard texture.

My garden is just about done for the season. My pepper plants are still doing good, still producing hot peppers. My daughter harvested her 50lb pumpkin that she grew from the seeds of last years Jack-o-lantern. My cabbages were under the pumpkin leaves and it stunted their growth. I am hoping they will make a come back now that the pumpkin plant has been removes from the garden bed.

I celebrated Mabon with the Three Cranes ADF grove again. I don’t think they have the video of the public ritual up, but they did make a video for solitary practitioners that I am including in this post for those interested.

I came across a YouTube video called “A Tale of two Heras” that got my creative juices flowing. I am thinking about adding a category to focus on my view of the various Greek and Roman gods.  To supplement between my garden updates, and book reviews.  I have also been listing to a few other of Mirth and Reverence videos that has got me reflecting on my early days of learning about Wicca. I have been so busy with work and school and life that I haven’t focused as much as I want to on my spiritual growth as I have wanted to. (or blogged for that matter.  Been thinking on how I can fit it in to my busy schedule better. Been wanting to reread several of my books to brush up on Neo-Pagan basics. I haven’t done any proper meditating lately, let alone try trance working. I want to get more familiar with the Ogham system of divination. I also need to get through my pile of books sitting on my night stand. So I am going to make a point of trying to do more of those things between now and the spring equinox. Also still debating about whether I want to just stay as a “friend of the grove” or buy the full ADF membership. I want to join but until I finish this degree I don’t have the time to dedicate to it like I want.

So that is my summery of this part of the season, hope all is going well with you my dear readers.

Farewell to Summer

This has been a rather remarkable summer for me. July started by me finally getting my Triple Goddess tattoo finished. I had a basic outline of the triple moon )0( on my chest when I was 18. Seventeen years later I had the center moon filled in to resemble the silver millennial crystal from sailor moon to represent transformation and growth. The side moons were colored in gold so the whole thing looks like a piece of jewelry. I then had a laurel wreath added behind it to represent my dedication to the Greek and Roman pantheon.

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The boyfriend took me to see the Roger Waters Concert, which was a neat experience. We then hit up the Dublin Irish Festival and watched The  Three Cranes Grove do their Lugahnasadh Rite.  I also manage to make it to two of their Druid Moon events which are much smaller celebrations to individual Celtic deities. I have been a solitary practitioner since I was 16 years old and working in a group setting a fun and challenging. Learning so much from the Druids been bringing elements of the ADF in to my home practice. I learned Wiccan principals early on because that is the only books you could find back in the day.  But I can say that I find the ADF format more satisfying. While Wicca seems to have a larger focus on spell craft the ADF is more focused on the connection with the Deities, Ancestors, and Nature Spirits.

The highlight of the summer was driving the six hours down to southern Kentucky to see the total eclipse. We drove down the day before and camped in Logan county. It was neat getting to meet so many other people at the campsite that came to see the same thing. Some came from as far as Vermont, New York and Florida. It was a fantastic yet fleeting moment. The sky looked like it was simultaneously sunrise and sunset, all purple and pinks.

My garden produces tomatoes and peppers faster than we could eat them and had to get creative with them in the kitchen making salsa, dehydrated tomatoes, homemade pasta sauce, and pizzas. The ground cherries were a fantastic first and going try lots more next year. we also got a pumpkin that is taking over everything like a slow moving monster. Pumpkinzilla has crowed out my cabbages…so no cabbages this year. 😦

Spent lots of time at the local metro parks enjoying the mild weather and all the flowers and trees. Had several close encounters with blue herons, owls, turtles and deer at the parks which was neat.

The days are shorter, the nights are cooler and there is a hint of autumn in the air. Plus pumpkin-spice-a-palooza has begun. Things are great here in the Buckeye state.

Book Review: ‘Hellenismos Today’, and ‘A Beginner’s Guide to Hellenismos’

Hellenismos Today by Timothy Jay Alexander is a book about Hellenic Reconstructionism, or in other words a a modern pagan religion based off ancient Greek religion. It is a hard polytheist moment  based that to quote the author ” focuses primarily in the public or popular religion of ancient Greece.” I feel like the author spends a lot of the book trying explain how it is not like Wicca / neo-paganism and poring out watered down Greek history and philosophy.  While an it is an interesting way to consider worshiping the Greek Pantheon it is just one way at looking at Greek reconstructionism.

Chapters

  • Introduction
  • Polythestic Reconstructionism
  • Ancient Greek Religion
  • Gods and Goddess
  • Cosmology
  • Ethics -(these are based off the Maxims of Delphi)
  • Role of Clergy
  • Rituals & Rites of Passage
  • Holidays & Festivals
  • Divination
  • Magick & Mysticism
  • Appendix I: Works and Days of Hesiod
  • Appendeix II: The Theogony of  Hesiod (note: both copies of Hesiod’s work presented in this book were translated by Hugh G. Evelyn White 1914 and edited by Timothy Jay Alexander)
  • Appendix III: The Emperor Julian’s Oration to the Sovereign Sun (translated by Taylor Thomas in 1793 and edited by Timothy Jay Alexander)

 

A Beginner’s Guide to Hellenismos  by Timothy Jay Alexander is the complementary book to the Hellenismos Today. As you can tell from the Chapter list below there is a lot of copy paste from the previous book, although the Appendix offer greater variety and complement the ones provides in Hellenismos Today. This book places an even bigger emphases on orthopraxy than the previous one did but offer little profound insights.

Chapters

  • Preface
  • Intro to Hellenismos
  • Theology
  • Three dimensions of Worship
  • Prayer & Hymns
  • Offerings
  • Rites and Ritual
  • Festival Calendar
  • Mysticism
  • Temples, Shrines, Statues & Images
  • Afterthoughts
  • Appendix I: Sallustius : On the Gods and the Cosmos (translated by Gilbert Murry 1925, edited by Timothy Jay Alexander)
  • Appendix II: The Emperor Julian’s Oration to the Mother of the Gods (translated by Taylor Thomas in 1793 and edited by Timothy Jay Alexander)
  • Appendix III: The Homeric Hymns (translated by Hugh G. Evelyn White 1914 and edited by Timothy Jay Alexander)
  • Appendix IV: Epithets of the Gods
  • Appendix V: A Glossery of Greek Words

Overall I felt Booth books fell a little flat for my taste. If you don’t already have a decent grasp on neo-paganism ideas and language the average reader may get lost. and the historical reverences and examples could really use some more fleshing out. In general I would say if you want to read these books get a copy from the library cause it is not really worth the purchase.